Expedition Team

Expedition October/November 2015

 

Dr Tom Trnski

Auckland Museum

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David Aguirre

Massey University

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Libby Liggins

Massey University

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Phil Ross

University of Waikato

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Sam McCormack

University of Waikato

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Andrew Pinniket

Our Big Blue Backyard

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Brady Doak

Our Big Blue Backyard

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Kina Scollay

Our Big Blue Backyard

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Kyle Swann

Our Big Blue Backyard

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Lindsey Davidson

Our Big Blue Backyard

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Ross Funnell

Our Big Blue Backyard

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The Great Humpback Whale Trail Expedition Team

 

Dr Rochelle Constantine

University of Auckland

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Olive Andrews

Conservation International
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Dr Simon Childerhouse

Blue Planet Marine

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Rémi Dodemont

Operation Cétacés, New Caledonia

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Dr Claire Garrigue

IRD, France & Operation Cétacés, New Caledonia

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Steve Hathaway

Underwater Cameraman

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Becky Lindsay

University of Auckland

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Richard Robinson

Photographer, Depth

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James Tremlett

Research Consultant

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Chris Gaskin

Seabird researcher

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Mark Miller

James Cook University

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The January 2015 Expedition Team

 

Dr Tom Trnski

Research Manager and Curator Marine Biology

Auckland Museum Read full profile

Sally Reader

Technical Officer, Ichthyology Collection

Australian Museum

Richard Robinson.

Richard Robinson

Underwater photographer

www.depth.co.nz

Irene Middleton.

Irene Middleton

Biosecurity Officer

Aquatics at Northland Regional Council

 

The 2013 Expedition Team

 

Dr Tom Trnski

Research Manager and Curator Marine Biology

Auckland Museum Read full profile

 

Steve Hathaway

Underwater videographer

93 Percent Read full profile

 

The 2011 Expedition Team

Led by Auckland Museum fish specialist Dr Tom Trnski, the expedition team includes scientists from Auckland Museum, Te Papa, the Department of Conservation (DoC), and NIWA.

An underwater photographer, scientific communicator and journalist, and a film-maker are also part of the 20-strong crew.

 

Dr Tom Trnski

Research Manager and Curator Marine Biology

Auckland Museum Read full profile

Alison Ballance

Our Changing World producer

Radio New Zealand Read full profile

Carl Struthers

Research & Technical Officer: Fishes

Te Papa Read full profile

Clinton Duffy

Clinton Duffy

Scientific Officer (Marine Species), Marine Conservation Team

Department of Conservation Read full profile

Ged Wiren

Collection Technician

Auckland Museum Read full profile

Dr Mandy Reid

Collection Manager, Malacology

Australian Museum Read full profile

Malcolm Francis

Principal Scientist

National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Read full profile

Mark McGrouther

Fish Collection Manager

Australian Museum Read full profile

Peter J. de Lange

Threatened Plant Scientist

Department of Conservation Read full profile

Richard Robinson

Underwater Photographer/Photojournalist

Depth.co.nz Read full profile

Dr Stephen Keable

Collection Manager, Marine Invertebrates

Australian Museum Read full profile

Stephen R Ullrich

Contract Diver

Auckland Museum Read full profile

Vincent Zintzen

Researcher

Te Papa Read full profile

Warren Chinn

Invertebrate Ecologist

Department of Conservation Read full profile

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What we hope to find out

The expedition team want to know what species occur on the Kermadec islands. The answer to this fundamental question will allow them to answer other questions:

  • Which nearby islands have the same species?
  • For which species are the Kermadecs a stepping stone on to New Zealand?
  • Are populations isolated from, or connected to other populations at surrounding islands?

Their mission is to:

  1. Discover and document new marine species and new records of marine species.
  2. Document the marine biodiversity of the Kermadec Islands focussing on marine plants and animals within 200m of the surface, and on species occuring to 1,000m.
  3. Determine the source of the closest relatives of the Kermadec populations.
  4. Provide a baseline record of species diversity against which to monitor changes over time. This will be important to track changes in species composition possibly resulting from global warming changes to regional water temperatures and currents.

Wish them luck!

An intrepid journey of this nature is weather dependent. Visiting the smaller islands will be difficult if the sea conditions are too rough. There is nowhere to hide if the wind is strong or the swell is large. Let’s hope for calm weather.