A new voyage of discovery & an ocean of Kermadec blogs

It’s more than a year since the museum’s Kermadec expedition returned and now a ship carrying 30 students and 25 scientists, business leaders, artists, educators and adventurers have set off on their own journey of discovery to the series of volcanic islands 1000kms north-east of New Zealand. The crew set off aboard the HMNZS Canterbury last Wednesday and will return this Sunday (August 19).

HMNZS Canterbury is taking a crew of 55 - including 30 students - to the Kermadec Islands

HMNZS Canterbury is taking a crew of 55 - including 30 students - to the Kermadec Islands

The Sir Peter Blake Trust, along with a fleet of supporters including the Royal NZ Navy, Department of Conservation and Pew Environment Group, is behind the voyage to the Kermadec Islands. It is also the inaugural voyage of the Young Blake Expeditions, which aims to give young people a chance to follow in the footsteps of Sir Peter Blake and to “to mobilise and inspire the next generation of Kiwi leaders, adventurers and environmentalists”.

Members of the expedition will also be contributing to New Zealand’s scientific knowledge by helping with shark tagging, dolphin DNA sampling and plankton monitoring.

We had an incredible time on our own expedition to the Kermadecs and we wish them all the best on their journey of discovery. We got a lot of feedback about how much you enjoyed following our progress and seeing what we’d found so we thought we’d share some of the great blogs that are coming off the ship.

Writing duties for the blog on the Sir Peter Blake Trust have so far been shared among the young students, who include 18 girls and 12 boys from as far
north as Whangarei, and as far south as Limehills in Southland. The first blog from aboard the ship was written by Hawkes Bay teenager Rose Mickleson and revealed the excitement on board as they head for Raoul Island.

Hawkes Bay student Rose Mickleson wrote the first blog from aboard the ship and revealed 'man overboard drills' were part of day one at sea

Hawkes Bay student Rose Mickleson wrote the first blog from aboard the ship and revealed 'man overboard drills' were part of day one at sea

For more news of the journey straight from the students you can check out the Yahoo blog or for a more scientific take on the journey you can follow Rebecca Priestley’s blog on the Scientific American site. Her first blog revealed the extent to which the chain of islands known as the Kermadec Islands are teeming with life. “Raoul Island is a pest-free nature reserve, its steep cliffs home to more than six million breeding seabirds. Like all the Kermadec Islands, the waters up to 12 nautical miles around the island are a no-take marine reserve, part of a stunning and pristine marine environment with a unique mix of tropical, sub-tropical and temperate species of fish. This is a rare ecosystem, where large predators rule, untroubled by fishing lines or nets.”

They’ve landed on Raoul now so there’s news of landfall!

Members of the Young Blake Expedition on Raoul

Members of the Young Blake Expedition on Raoul

We hope you enjoy your Kermadec blog fix – there’s plenty to choose from. Have a safe, successful (vicarious) journey!

HMNZS Canterbury

HMNZS Canterbury

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3 Responses to “A new voyage of discovery & an ocean of Kermadec blogs”

  1. Patricia Hammond

    Lucky young students. Their interest in marine biology, conservation, and travel will be awakened!
    I wonder if they saw ” the islands of pumice” – What a fantastic experience.

    Reply
  2. Ian Carswell

    I agree with Patricia. These students will remember this trip for a long time. What a great classroom!

    Reply

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